Laws that Ensure Gender Protection in the Workplace

According to the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), sex or gender is the basis of one of the most widespread types of discrimination in the workplace. This type of discrimination can be committed through: unfavorable treatment of a person simple because of his/her gender; less favorable treatment of a person due to his/her being connected to a group that is associated with people of a particular sex; or bias against someone due to his/her being a transgender, bisexual or gay/lesbian.

With regard to gender identity, which concerns lesbians, gays, bisexuals and the transgender, the Obama administration held that those it referred to are worthy of the same legal protection against workplace discrimination just like everyone else. Thus, due to the move of the Obama administration to include gender identity in the classes protected by EEOC, the latter ruled on July 1, 2011, that job discrimination against lesbians, gays, bisexuals and the transgender (LGBT) signified sex-stereotyping and, so, violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, which was made a law by the US Congress in 1964, forbids all forms of job discrimination in any aspect of employment. According to the website of Cary Kane Legal, this act is meant protect employees and job applicants from discriminatory acts that may be based on color, race, religion, national origin and sex, in matters concerning hiring, promotion, job training, job assignment, wage, fringe benefits, firing, and so forth.

Protecting one’s rights and interests in matters relating to salary in relation to his/her gender has also been made the concern of another law, one that was passed a year ahead of Title VII: the Equal Pay Act of 1963. This law illegalizes sex discrimination in salary scales; it specifically mandates that women and men, who are assigned to perform substantially the same work in the same establishment, should be given the same amount of pay.

Aside from Title VII and the Equal Pay Act, there are also laws that prohibit anyone who has been charged with workplace discrimination from committing any act in retaliation against the person who filed the discrimination charge.

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